War Games: “The Aggressor” 1957 US Army; The Big Picture TV-362

Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://quickfound.net/ ‘”The Aggressors,” a giant training aid of the United States Army, was formed after World War II at Fort Riley, Kansas. Their job: to create as realistic a maneuver enemy as…

War Games: "The Aggressor" 1957 US Army; The Big Picture TV-362

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‘”The Aggressors,” a giant training aid of the United States Army, was formed after World War II at Fort Riley, Kansas. Their job: to create as realistic a maneuver enemy as possible so that combat training will approach the feeling of actual combat. In the first half of this most unusual THE BIG PICTURE, audiences discover the Aggressor Amy, Member Circle Trigon Party, have liberated large areas of the continental United States, but because of their success, THE BIG PICTURE viewers have been kept from the facts. This is a short documentary showing the liberation of the United States to date. After setting the pace for this program in the first 15 minutes, the camera examines closely this gigantic training aid of the Army. It is explained that at the close of World War II, a board of 100 combat-experienced American generals was formed to recommend training policies for the future. Out of these recommendations came the Aggressor concept of a maneuver enemy. The general mission of the Aggressor Army was threefold: First, to provide a realistic enemy for maneuver training; second, to provide realistic situations for intelligence training; third, to make sure that all American soldiers are aware that any future enemy will look and act differently from what they are accustomed to.’

Originally a public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_exercise
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

A military exercise or war game is the employment of military resources in training for military operations, either exploring the effects of warfare or testing strategies without actual combat. This also serves the purpose of ensuring the combat readiness of garrisoned or deployable forces prior to deployment from a home base.

War games involving two or more countries allows for better coordination between militaries, observation of enemy’s tactics, and is a visible show of strength for the participating countries.

Exercises in the 20th and 21st centuries have often been identified by a unique codename, such as Cobra Gold, in the same manner as military contingency operations and combat operations like Operation Phantom Fury…

Command Post Exercise

A Command Post Exercise (CPX) typically focuses on the battle readiness of staffs such as a particular Unified Combatant Command or one of its components at any level. It may run in parallel with an FTX or its equivalent, or as a stand-alone event for headquarters staff only with heavy emphasis on simulated events.

Field exercise

Historical names for the field exercise, or the full-scale rehearsal of military maneuvers as practice for warfare in the military services of the British Commonwealth include “schemes,” while those of the military services United States are known as Field Training Exercises (FTX), or, in the case of naval forces, Fleet Exercises (FLEETEX).
In a field exercise or fleet exercise, the two sides in the simulated battle are typically called “red” (simulating the enemy forces) and “blue”, to avoid naming a particular adversary. This naming convention originates with the inventors of the table-top war-game (the “Kriegsspiel”), the Prussians von Reiswitz; their army wore Prussian blue, so friendly forces were depicted by the color blue.

Joint exercise

Several different armed forces of the same nation training together are described as having a joint exercise, while those involving forces of multiple nations are described as having a combined exercise.
These latter events incorporating multiple nations have often been referred to as NATO exercises, Coalition exercises, Bilateral exercises (based on security arrangements/agreements solely between two nations), Multilateral exercises (based on security arrangements/agreements between multiple nations), or other similarly named events…

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