Where are the jobs for our heroes?

According to the Labor Department, the unemployment rate for veterans fell to 4.6% in 2015, the lowest level in seven years. However, the unemployment rate for younger veterans and those who have served post 9-11 is nearly 6%. So how…

Where are the jobs for our heroes?

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According to the Labor Department, the unemployment rate for veterans fell to 4.6% in 2015, the lowest level in seven years. However, the unemployment rate for younger veterans and those who have served post 9-11 is nearly 6%. So how can these Americans use their skills to find high paying jobs, while also gaining a foothold on a career path? Businesses in the Waste and Recycling Industry continue to experience challenges recruiting and retaining qualified drivers and mechanics. Industry projections show nearly 125,000 new jobs for collection drivers and diesel mechanics will be available by 2022, a 21% growth rate. The reason for the shortages is due in part to driver retirement which is estimated at 30% annually by American Trucking Association. Another factor contributing to the worker shortage is fewer people are entering the mechanical and transportation fields. Returning veterans with mechanical skills and those who drove heavy machinery while deployed have many opportunities before them. In fact, the U.S. Department of Transportation is making it easier for veterans who drove heavy machinery and vehicles to become eligible for a commercial driver’s license (CDL) in an expedited manner upon finishing their service. In this interview, the National Waste & Recycling Association’s Sharon H. Kneiss will discusses how the industry is reaching out to veteran’s groups about employment opportunities. Sharon is joined by Brian Groshon, a decorated army veteran who served two tours in Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom. In 2014, Brian successfully adapted his military skills to begin a career in the waste management industry.

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